The End…A Farewell

December 26, 2010 § Leave a comment

Hello all,

It has been wonderful being in a class with all of you. I had a great time and it was easily one of my favorite classes, in no small part due to the our awesome class. I doubt many of you will read this – what with the class being over and second semester seniors to boot – but I wanted to thank all of you for such a great semester. Especially Carla, since it’s not often that I get watch The Lion King and call it research =D

 

Have a great 5 days and 2011 everyone!

-Matthew Roy, “sǝɹıɟ & sɹıɟ”

 

 

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Cove

December 12, 2010 § Leave a comment

I’ll preface this blog with the fact that I’m kind of playing devil’s advocate and know that dolphins and chickens aren’t on the same level.

I don’t really understand why we feel compassion for certain animals but are indifferent to the suffering of others.  I have always struggled with why people are so eager to defend certain animals yet have no problem with supporting the mass murder of others. When I was little I read a statistic about how dolphins and cows come from a common ancestor, something to think about. It’s surprising that people are so willing to protest the slaughter of 23,000 dolphins in a year when they gladly support industries that mercilessly kill 35 million cows in the same amount of time and 23 million chickens per day. I think that in order for humans to feel sympathy towards animals they must project human-like qualities onto those animals.  In the case of dolphins intelligence (and their ever present smile) plays a huge role in why we relate to them but the source of an animal’s value doesn’t necessarily stem from our perception of their intelligence but greater influenced by factors such as cuteness. I will use the overused statistic favored by vegetarians, pigs are smarter than dogs but they aren’t quite as cute or cuddly. I’m not going to argue against the fact that dolphins are very special animals, it’s just that I think that all animals are valuable.

Save the Oceans

December 11, 2010 § Leave a comment

Imagine yourself on a plane, gliding over farmlands on your trip across the country. You look out the window noticing all of the circles on the ground, as you fly about at incredible speeds to your destination. If you look up, you can see the dark purple of space, so much closer at the altitude you are cruising at. As you glide you are suddenly caught in an updraft. The plane is thrown all about and you sudden feel like you are falling. You feel the pit in your stomach as you clutch to the armrest to keep yourself from flying out of your seat, and you have that feeling that you might not survive this flight. « Read the rest of this entry »

One cannot simply walk into The Cove

December 7, 2010 § Leave a comment

Two maybe…

Anyway, so far The Cove is seriously disturbing. The revulsion I feel is a visceral thing, an instinctive reaction to that much death. What boggles my mind is that the fishermen KNOW that they are doing something that would appear horrible to most of the world. And they happily continue beating dolphins to death.

Which is, of course, completely unfair of us to judge them on.

No, I’m not kidding. I am revolted by their actions and horrified by wanton killing taking place.

Yet, I’m sure that killings and dismemberments every bit as gruesome take place in our slaughterhouses.

We are guilty of our own assembly lines of death.

How would India, where the cow is something sacred, look at something like the image below?

 

I think killing dolphins is wrong. It is revolting. But at the same time we have to understand that our hands are not entirely clean either (unless you are a life-long vegan I guess).

So we should fight to save the dolphins. But also keep in mind, what they are doing is only outlawed from the world because the world opinion is against them. If most of the world saw cows as being sacred it might be us that people would look at nauseously.

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